Houston, Texas (1956) … Tools published that exploit router flaw (December 30, 2011) …item 4.. Hackers continue to exploit outdated browser plug-ins (Posted on 07. Mar, 2012) …

//Houston, Texas (1956) … Tools published that exploit router flaw (December 30, 2011) …item 4.. Hackers continue to exploit outdated browser plug-ins (Posted on 07. Mar, 2012) …

Houston, Texas (1956) … Tools published that exploit router flaw (December 30, 2011) …item 4.. Hackers continue to exploit outdated browser plug-ins (Posted on 07. Mar, 2012) …

Check out these todays smart phone technologies images:

Houston, Texas (1956) … Tools published that exploit router flaw (December 30, 2011) …item 4.. Hackers continue to exploit outdated browser plug-ins (Posted on 07. Mar, 2012) …
todays smart phone technologies
Image by marsmet481
Typically, it would take a hacker about 100 million tries to crack an eight digit code. But because the router indicates whether or not some digits are correct, that number drops to around 11,000 attempts before access can be gained, according to Viehbock’s research paper.

Once an hacker figures out the PIN, it’s much easier to figure out the router’s password and gain access to the network.
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……..***** All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ……..
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… marsmet501 photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/63583766@N04/
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…..item 1)…. CNET … news.cnet.com … Tools published that exploit router flaw …

by Marguerite Reardon … December 30, 2011 8:32 AM PST ….

Researchers have released two tools that can be used to exploit a vulnerability in a protocol that makes it easier to set up secure home Wi-Fi networks.

news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57350220-83/tools-published-tha…

Stefan Viehbock, who first reported the vulnerability to the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team, released a tool that can crack a home Wi-Fi network in two hours. And Craig Heffner of Tactical Network Solutions, who had been working independently on figuring out the same vulnerability that Viebock reported to US-CERT, has also developed a tool that will allow hackers to gain access to some secure Wi-Fi networks in four to 10 hours. His tool called Reaver is hosted on Google Code.

The vulnerability itself is inherent in the Wi-Fi Protected Set-up protocol. This protocol, which is often bundled into Wi-Fi routers, is designed to allow unskilled home users to set up secure networks using WPA encryption without much hassle. Users are then able to type in a shortened PIN instead of a long pass-phrase when adding a new device to the secure network.

The problem is that when security PINs are entered for access to the network, the router actually lets the user know if has gotten the first or last numbers of the 8-digit code correct. The code that Viehbock and Heffner have written use a brute-force approach, which means different combinations of PINs are tried over and over until one is found that allows the hacker access. This can be done since most routers don’t limit the number of attempts on the passwords used to access the router.

Typically, it would take a hacker about 100 million tries to crack an eight digit code. But because the router indicates whether or not some digits are correct, that number drops to around 11,000 attempts before access can be gained, according to Viehbock’s research paper. Once an hacker figures out the PIN, it’s much easier to figure out the router’s password and gain access to the network.

The security flaw could affect millions of people with Wi-Fi routers in their homes and businesses, since the protocol is integrated into most new wireless routers sold today. The US-CERT warning named all the major wireless router brands: Buffalo, D-Link, Cisco Linksys, Netgear, Technicolor, TP-Link, and ZyXEL.

So far none of these companies have responded to the US-CERT warning with a fix, nor have they provided comment to the press on this situation. CNET reached out to each of these companies. Buffalo and Cisco representatives said they were looking into the issue, but they have still not officially responded.

Viehbock and Heffner say this is why they have published their tools, so that they could draw attention to the issue.

The fix right now is that users can disable the WPS set-up on their routers.
Originally posted at Signal Strength

Marguerite Reardon

Marguerite Reardon has been a CNET News reporter since 2004, covering cell phone services , broadband, citywide Wi-Fi, the Net neutrality debate, as well as the ongoing consolidation of the phone companies.
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…..item 2)…. Yahoo! Finance … finance.yahoo.com/news … If You’re Using ‘Password1,’ Change It. Now.

By Stacy Cowley | CNNMoney.com – 6 hours ago ….. Thursday March 01, 2012 …

finance.yahoo.com/news/if-you-re-using–password1—chang…

The number one way hackers get into protected systems isn’t through a fancy technical exploit. It’s by guessing the password.

That’s not too hard when the most common password used on business systems is "Password1."

There’s a technical reason for Password1’s popularity: It’s got an upper-case letter, a number and nine characters. That satisfies the complexity rules for many systems, including the default settings for Microsoft’s widely used Active Directory identity management software.

Security services firm Trustwave spotlighted the "Password1" problem in its recently released "2012 Global Security Report," which summarizes the firm’s findings from nearly 2 million network vulnerability scans and 300 recent security breach investigations.

Around 5% of passwords involve a variation of the word "password," the company’s researchers found. The runner-up, "welcome," turns up in more than 1%.

Easily guessable or entirely blank passwords were the most common vulnerability Trustwave’s SpiderLabs unit found in its penetration tests last year on clients’ systems. The firm set an assortment of widely available password-cracking tools loose on 2.5 million passwords, and successfully broke more than 200,000 of them.

Verizon came up with similar results in its 2012 Data Breach Investigations Report, one of the security industry’s most comprehensive annual studies. The full report will be released in several months, but Verizon previewed some of its findings at this week’s RSA conference in San Francisco.

Exploiting weak or guessable passwords was the top method attackers used to gain access last year. It played a role in 29% of the security breaches Verizon’s response team investigated.

[Related: Smartphone Features You Don’t Really Need]

Verizon’s scariest finding was that attackers are often inside victims’ networks for months or years before they’re discovered. Less than 20% of the intrusions Verizon studied were discovered within days, let alone hours.

Even scarier: Few companies discovered the breach on their own. More than two-thirds learned they’d been attacked only after an external party, such as a law-enforcement agency, notified them. Trustwave’s findings were almost identical: Only 16% of the cases it investigated last year were internally detected.

So if your password is something guessable, what’s the best way to make it more secure? Make it longer.

Adding complexity to your password — swapping "password" for "p@S$ w0rd" — protects against so-called "dictionary" attacks, which automatically check against a list of standard words.

But attackers are increasingly using brute-force tools that simply cycle through all possible character combinations. Length is the only effective guard against those. A seven-character password has 70 trillion possible combinations; an eight-character password takes that to more than 6 quadrillion.

Even a few quadrillion options isn’t a big deal for modern machines, though. Using a ,500 computer built with off-the-shelf parts, it took Trustwave just 10 hours to harvest its 200,000 broken passwords.

"We’ve got to get ourselves using stuff larger than human memory capacity," independent security researcher Dan Kaminsky said during an RSA presentation on why passwords don’t work.

He acknowledged that it’s an uphill fight. Biometric authentication, smartcards, one-time key generators and other solutions can increase security, but at the cost of adding complexity.

"The fundamental win of the password over every other authentication technology is its utter simplicity on every device," Kaminsky said. "This is, of course, also their fundamental failing." To top of page
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…..item 3)…. Phantom Report … www.phantomreport.com … Resistance Against the Enemies of Freedom …

China testing cyber-attack capabilities
March 8, 2012 Posted by Phantom Report

www.phantomreport.com/china-testing-cyber-attack-capabili…

For a decade or more, Chinese military officials have talked about conducting warfare in cyberspace, but in recent years they have progressed to testing attack capabilities during exercises, according to a congressional report to be released Thursday.

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) probably would target transportation and logistics networks before an actual conflict to try to delay or disrupt the United States’ ability to fight, according to the report prepared by Northrop Grumman for the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.

The Chinese military conducted an exercise in October involving “joint information offensive and defensive operations” and another in 2010 featuring attacks on communications command-and-control systems, according to the commission, which was set up by Congress.

Such exercises, combined with evidence that China is streamlining its forces to integrate cyber and electronic warfare and is financing research in the two areas, show that “Chinese capabilities in computer network operations have advanced sufficiently to pose genuine risk to U.S. military operations in the event of a conflict,” the report asserted.

Although the report provides no evidence that China can launch destructive attacks on U.S. targets, it serves as yet another warning to policymakers and the public that the United States has adversaries intent on catching up to, or surpassing, it in cyber capabilities. The report comes as Congress considers major cybersecurity legislation.

Read More: Washington Post
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In our age there is no such thing as ‘keeping out of politics.’ All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred and schizophrenia.

-George Orwell

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…..item 4)…. CYBER WAR ZONE … www.cyberwarzone.com … Hackers continue to exploit outdated browser plug-ins

Posted on 07. Mar, 2012 by siavash

Tag: Adobe Shockwave, Android devices, attack vector, blackberry, hackers, iPhone, Malicious URLs Pick a random article for me

www.cyberwarzone.com/cyberwarfare/hackers-continue-exploi…
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img code photo … cybersecurity

www.cyberwarzone.com/sites/default/files/images/cybersecu…

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Outdated browser plug-ins continue to be a leading attack vector, according to a recent Zscaler ThreatLabZ report.

Zscaler ThreatLabZ, the research arm of cloud security firm Zscaler, observed that Adobe Shockwave was the most outdated browser plug-in during the third quarter of 2011, with 94% of those installed being outdated.

According to its most recent ‘2011 State of the Web’ report, there was a dramatic shift in the fourth quarter. Shockwave is down to 52% outdated of all installed, and Adobe Reader now tops the list at 61%. Hackers are aware that large amounts of users continue to run outdated plug-ins and use these as an easy attack vector, the report warned.

Botnets comprised the majority of threats seen in December, at 80% of Zscaler blocks. Malicious URLs followed far behind at 14%, while a mere 3% of threats blocked were identified by anti-virus/signature detection.

The report found that enterprises are moving to the more secure Internet Explorer 8. The use of IE 8 has more than doubled in the enterprise over 2011, from 26% of overall IE traffic in January to 55% in December. The report noted that while enterprises are moving to newer and more secure web browsers, IE 9 adoption remains very low.

Overall, IE use in the enterprise followed a slow decline, down to 53% in the fourth quarter from 58% in the third quarter. Meanwhile, Chrome usage saw a big jump from 0.17% of all web browser use in the third quarter to 5% in the fourth quarter, while Safari saw a decline from 7% in third quarter to 4% in the fourth quarter. Firefox usage remained constant at 10%.

In addition, Zscaler ThreatLabZ observed an 85% increase in mobile traffic during the fourth quarter. iPhone and Android devices dominated mobile traffic, accounting for about 87% of such, while Blackberry use fell sharply from 27% to 13% over the quarter.

Info
Article Author:
infosecurity

Source: www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/24383/hackers-continue…
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…..item 5)…. The SCADA & Smart Grid Cyber Security Summit 2012 … April 26th & 27th, London ..

…..MARCH 08, 2012….

scadacybersecuritysummit.com/index.html

Assess the nature of the latest threats being faced by energy companies and the impact of these upon your organisation.

Discover why Utility Cyber Security has been reaching a state of near chaos and the latest strategies from utilities to gain the upper-hand against hackers.

Understand the importance of industrial control system (ICS) security and assess the latest solutions on offer.

Discuss the most promising cyber security technologies in the marketplace.

Assess the trends to watch in utility cyber security.

Discover the best practice from across Europe in protecting SCADA and the Smart Grid from cyber-attack.

Benefit from case study presentations from a wide range of international utilities and energy companies.

Network with your industry peers in the comfort of a 5 star venue.

—Featuring a two-day Conference & Exhibition, with over 25 top level speakers.

—Discover the latest technologies and solutions for cyber security in the Technology Exhibition

—By popular demand from Utilities this year’s event will include a selection of 3 not to be missed training workshops on SCADA and Smart Grid Cyber Security.

—Network with your industry peers and make vital new contacts.
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High level event taking place in Miami 21st & 22nd May – REGISTRATIONS are now open to attend & sponsor the…: t.co/5FTZjgy4
@ Thu Mar 08 19:45:15

White House simulates cyberattack for senators in push for more regulation – t.co/NWshFv6O
@ Thu Mar 08 17:27:28

Apple takes wraps off iPad 3 – t.co/yeytOrf2
@ Thu Mar 08 17:27:01

join the conversation

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PhotonQ-The Older Stuff
todays smart phone technologies
Image by PhOtOnQuAnTiQuE
Trying to figure out how to use this stuff of older people, out of proportion, non tactile, black and white and complex device, all that and giving you old news hours ago , about the state of the World… Technology do change the World… people too… Poor Kid… Lucky kid… =)

I remember as a kid to never understand what pleasure adults add to read such format… I cannot imagine kids today who are used to smart phones and tablets =)

What does this photo makes you think about ?

One of them is reminding me of Kevin Kelly :

“Humans are the reproductive organs of technology.”

“Extrapolated, technology wants what life wants:
Increasing efficiency
Increasing opportunity
Increasing emergence
Increasing complexity
Increasing diversity
Increasing specialization
Increasing ubiquity
Increasing freedom
Increasing mutualism
Increasing beauty
Increasing sentience
Increasing structure
Increasing evolvability”

? Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants

EarthHour_3FingerClub_6559
todays smart phone technologies
Image by \!/_PeacePlusOne
Candle Light Earth Hour at the 3 Finger Club LOHHAS Lifestyle Lounge

Lights were out between 8:30 and 9:30 while we told stories and discussed our Lifestyle Of Health, Happiness And Sustainability (LOHHAS) using the 3 Finger "Peace Plus One" Sustainability Salute to remind us about Peace, Harmony and Balance between Society, Environment and Economy

People were the best jugglers of "Society, Environment, Economy" balls won "EARTH HOUR 60" T-Shirts WOW \!/O\!/

Photo Courtesy of the McMaster Institute for Sustainable Development in Commerce

www.SustainabilitySymbol.com
www.PeacePlusOne.com
www.Dragonpreneur.com

all participants in the Earth Hour Discussion got a copy of "Letter to Maddie" featured below:

We Screwed Up
A Letter of Apology to My Granddaughter
By Chip Ward

[Note: I became politically active and committed on the day 20 years ago when I realized I could stand on the front porch of my house and point to three homes where children were in wheelchairs, to a home where a child had just died of leukemia, to another where a child was born missing a kidney, and yet another where a child suffered from spina bifida. All my parental alarms went off at once and I asked the obvious question: What’s going on here? Did I inadvertently move my three children into harm’s way when we settled in this high desert valley in Utah? A quest to find answers in Utah’s nuclear history and then seek solutions followed. Politics for me was never motivated by ideology. It was always about parenting.

Today my three kids are, thankfully, healthy adults. But now that grandchildren are being added to our family, my blood runs cold whenever I project out 50 years and imagine what their world will be like at middle age — assuming they get that far and that there is still a recognizable “world” to be part of. I wrote the following letter to my granddaughter, Madeline, who is almost four years old. Although she cannot read it today, I hope she will read it in a future that proves so much better than the one that is probable, and so terribly unfair. I’m sharing this letter with other parents and grandparents in the hope that it may move them to embrace their roles as citizens and commit to the hard work of making the planet viable, the economy equitable, and our culture democratic for the many Madelines to come.]

March 20, 2012

Dear Maddie,

I address this letter to you, but please share it with Jack, Tasiah, and other grandchildren who are yet unborn. Also, with your children and theirs. My unconditional love for my children and grandchildren convinces me that, if I could live long enough to embrace my great-grandchildren, I would love them as deeply as I love you.

On behalf of my generation of grandparents to all of you, I want to apologize.

I am sorry we used up all the oil. It took a million years for those layers of carbon goo to form under the Earth’s crust and we used up most of it in a geological instant. No doubt there will be some left and perhaps you can get around the fact that what remains is already distant, dirty, and dangerous, but the low-hanging fruit will be long-gone by the time you are my age. We took it all.

There’s no excuse, really. We are gas-hogs, plain and simple. We got hooked on faster-bigger-more and charged right over the carrying capacity of the planet. Oil made it possible.

Machines are our slaves and coal, oil, and gas are their food. They helped us grow so much of our own food that we could overpopulate the Earth. We could ship stuff and travel all over the globe, and still have enough fuel left to drive home alone in trucks in time to watch Monday Night Football.

Rocket fuel, fertilizer, baby bottles, lawn chairs: we made everything and anything out of oil and could never get enough of it. We could have conserved more for you to use in your lifetime. Instead, we demonstrated the self-restraint of crack addicts. It’s been great having all that oil to play with and we built our entire world around that. Living without it will be tough. Sorry.

I hope we develop clean, renewable energy sources soon, or that you and your generation figure out how to do that quickly. In the meantime, sorry about the climate. We just didn’t realize our addiction to carbon would come with monster storms, epic droughts, Biblical floods, wildfire infernos, rising seas, migration, starvation, pestilence, civil war, failed states, police states, and resource wars.

I’m sure Henry Ford didn’t see that coming when he figured out how to mass-produce automobiles and sell them to Everyman. I know my parents didn’t see the downside of using so much gas and coal. The all-electric house and a car in the driveway was their American Dream. For my generation, owning a car became a birthright. Today, it would be hard for most of us to live without a car. I have no idea what you’ll do to get around or how you will heat your home. Oops!

We also pigged out on most of the fertile soil, the forests and their timber, and the oceans that teemed with fish before we scraped the seabed raw, dumped our poisonous wastes in the water, and turned it acid and barren. Hey, that ocean was an awesome place and it’s too bad you can’t know it like we did. There were bright coral reefs, vibrant runs of red salmon, ribbons of birds embroidering the shores, graceful shells, the solace and majesty of the wild sea…

…But then I never saw the vast herds of bison that roamed the American heartland, so I know it is hard to miss something you only saw in pictures. We took lots of photos.

We thought we were pretty smart because we walked a man on the moon. Our technology is indeed amazing. I was raised without computers, smart phones, and the World Wide Web, so I appreciate how our engineering prowess has enhanced our lives, but I also know it has a downside.

When I was a kid we worried that the Cold War would go nuclear. And it wasn’t until a river caught fire near Cleveland that we realized fouling your own nest isn’t so smart after all. Well, you know about the rest — the coal-fired power plants, acid rain, the hole in the ozone…

www.tomdispatch.com/images/managed/fear2.gifThere were plenty of signs we took a wrong turn but we kept on going. Dumb, stubborn, blind: Who knows why we couldn’t stop? Greed maybe — powerful corporations we couldn’t overcome. It won’t matter much to you who is to blame. You’ll be too busy coping in the diminished world we bequeath you.

One set of problems we pass on to you is not altogether our fault. It was handed down to us by our parents’ generation so hammered by cataclysmic world wars and economic hardship that they armed themselves to the teeth and saw enemies everywhere. Their paranoia was understandable, but they passed their fears on to us and we should have seen through them. I have lived through four major American wars in my 62 years, and by now defense and homeland security are powerful industries with a stranglehold on Congress and the economy. We knew that was a lousy deal, but trauma and terror darkened our imaginations and distorted our priorities. And, like you, we needed jobs.

Sorry we spent your inheritance on all that cheap bling and, especially, all those weapons of mass destruction. That was crazy and wasteful. I can’t explain it. I guess we’ve been confused for a long time now.

Oh, and sorry about the confusion. We called it advertising and it seemed like it would be easy enough to control. When I was a kid, commercials merely interrupted entertainment. Don’t know when the lines all blurred and the buy, buy, buy message became so ubiquitous and all-consuming. It just got outta hand and we couldn’t stop it, even when we realized we hated it and that it was taking us over. We turned away from one another, tuned in, and got lost.

I’m betting you can still download this note, copy it, share it, bust it up and remake it, and that you do so while plugged into some sort of electrical device you can’t live without — so maybe you don’t think that an apology for technology is needed and, if that’s the case, an apology is especially relevant. The tools we gave you are fine, but the apps are mostly bogus. We made an industry of silly distraction. When our spirits hungered, we fed them clay that filled but did not nourish them. If you still don’t know the difference, blame us because we started it.

And sorry about the chemicals. I mean the ones you were born with in your blood and bones that stay there — even though we don’t know what they’ll do to you). Who thought that the fire retardant that kept smokers from igniting their pillows and children’s clothes from bursting into flames would end up in umbilical cords and infants?

It just seemed like better living through chemistry at the time. Same with all the other chemicals you carry. We learned to accept cancer and I guess you will, too. I’m sure there will be better treatments for that in your lifetime than we have today. If you can afford them, that is. Turning healthcare over to predatory corporations was another bad move.

All in all, our chemical obsession was pretty reckless and we got into that same old pattern: just couldn’t give up all the neat stuff. Oh, we tried. We took the lead out of gasoline and banned DDT, but mostly we did too little, too late. I hope you’ve done better. Maybe it will help your generation to run out of oil, since so many of the toxic chemicals came from that. Anyway, we didn’t see it coming and we could have, should have. Our bad.

There are so many other things I wish I could change for you. We leave behind a noisy world. Silence is rare today, and unless some future catastrophe has left your numbers greatly diminished, your machines stilled, and your streets ghostly empty, it is likely that the last remnants of tranquility will be gone by the time you are my age.

And how about all those species, the abundant and wondrous creatures that are fading away forever as I write these words? I never saw a polar bear and I guess you can live without that, too, but when I think of the peep and chirp of frogs at night, the hum of bees busy on a flower bed, the trill of birds at dawn, and so many other splendorous pleasures that you may no longer have, I ache with regret. We should have done more to keep the planet whole and well, but we couldn’t get clear of the old ways of seeing, the ingrained habits, the way we hobble one another’s choices so that the best intentions never get realized.

Mostly I’m sorry about taking all the good water. When I was a child I could kneel down and drink from a brook or spring wherever we camped and played. We could still hike up to glaciers and ski down snow-capped mountains.

Clean, crisp, cold, fresh water is life’s most precious taste. A life-giving gift, all water is holy. I repeat: holy. We treated it, instead, as if it were merely useful. We wasted and tainted it and, again in a geological moment, sucked up aquifers that had taken 10,000 years to gather below ground. In my lifetime, glaciers are melting away, wells are running dry, dust storms are blowing, and rivers like the mighty Colorado are running dry before they reach the sea. I hate to think of what will be left for you. Sorry. So very, very sorry.

I’m sure there’s a boatload of other trouble we’re leaving you that I haven’t covered here. My purpose is not to offer a complete catalog of our follies and atrocities, but to do what we taught your parents to do when they were as little as you are today.

When you make a mistake, we told them, admit it, and then do better. If you do something wrong, own up and say you are sorry. After that, you can work on making amends.

I am trying to see a way out of the hardship and turmoil we are making for you. As I work to stop the madness, I will be mindful of how much harder your struggles will be as you deal with the challenges we leave you to face.

The best I can do to help you through the overheated future we are making is to love you now. I cannot change the past and my struggle to make a healthier future for you is uncertain, but today I can teach you, encourage you, and help you be as strong and smart and confident as you can be, so that whatever the future holds, whatever crises you face, you are as ready as possible. We will learn to laugh together, too, because love and laughter can pull you through the toughest times.

I know a better world is possible. We create that better world by reaching out to one another, listening, learning, and speaking from our hearts, face to face, neighbor to neighbor, one community after another, openly, inclusively, bravely. Democracy is not a gift to be practiced only when permitted. We empower ourselves. Our salvation is found in each other, together.

Across America this morning and all around the world, our better angels call to us, imploring us to rise up and be as resilient as our beloved, beautiful children and grandchildren, whose future we make today. We can do better. I promise.

Your grandfather,

Chip Ward

By | 2012-11-27T05:24:29+00:00 November 27th, 2012|Todays Smart Phone Technologies|0 Comments

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