Letting Go of the Words, Second Edition: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies)

//Letting Go of the Words, Second Edition: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies)

Letting Go of the Words, Second Edition: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies)

[wpramazon asin=”0123859301″]
[wpramazon asin=”1568587074″]

Find More Text Message Marketing Products

By | 2013-09-01T21:26:42+00:00 September 1st, 2013|Text Message Marketing|6 Comments

About the Author:

6 Comments

  1. COSMIC TRAVELER September 1, 2013 at 9:44 pm
    11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    FORGET ABOUT IT!!, September 6, 2012
    This review is from: Letting Go of the Words, Second Edition: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies) (Paperback)

    Are you waking up at night worrying about strategy and tactics? If you are, then this book is for you! Author Janice (Ginny) Redish has done an outstanding job of writing a second edition of a book on how to help you have great conversations through your web site, mobile app, social media, and whatever future innovations encourage interactions between you and others.

    Author Redish, begins by showing you how to have good conversations through your web site. In addition, the author delves into why planning your content is critical for apps, web sites, individual web topics, blogs, social media messages, and everything you write. She then discusses how to integrate content and design from the beginning. The author then, shows you how to consider the entire site. She continues by looking at the size of your site; if it is large enough, then you may need pathway pages between the home page and the information people want. In addition, the author tackles four important guidelines: Think information, not document; divide your content thoughtfully; consider how much to put on one web page; and, use PDFs sparingly and only for good reasons.
    She then continues to focus on not hogging the conversation within a single web topic. Next, the author reminds you how to combine labels with more information. Then, she shows you how to choose a good heading style: questions, statement, verb phrases, etc. The author continues by looking at how to write the paragraphs, sentences, and words of your web content. In addition, she encourages you to use numbered lists for instructions as much as possible. Next, the author warns that you should not make program or product names links by themselves. She then describes what makes illustrations work well, or not work well. The author continues by showing you how to negotiate successful reviews and edits. Finally, she shows you how to do usability testing of the content.

    This most excellent book will help you create great content. Perhaps more importantly, this book shows you how to meet your business goals by satisfying your site visitors’ conversations through usability testing.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. Chris F. Willis "Media1der" September 1, 2013 at 9:57 pm
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Indispensable Resource!, September 21, 2012
    By 
    Chris F. Willis “Media1der” (West Michigan, USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Letting Go of the Words, Second Edition: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies) (Paperback)

    I have been a huge fan of Ginny’s Letting Go of the Words since the first edition as a one-stop resource for my eLearning content development team. We even led an internal workshop around the content of the book, as it is jam packed with best practices for writing for online viewers. This new edition builds on the first with updated research and examples, and is even more needed and welcome.

    We find many of the new generation workforce woefully unaware of what our firm considers the most basic rules of writing – understanding the needs of the reader, using active voice, creating a hierarchy of useful headings, paring down the amount of content to fit the delivery medium … This is especially true of new team members who come to us through a technical or graphic design track, but even degreed writers can be missing key foundational online writing skills. This book is an indispensable tool for filling in those gaps, and level-setting the entire team.

    Whether you are tasked with writing for web sites, marketing, eLearning, or business portals, you would be hard pressed to find a more complete and useful primer.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. Anonymous September 1, 2013 at 10:28 pm
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A must read for anyone involved with CMS, August 20, 2013
    By 
    Jill U.

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Letting Go of the Words, Second Edition: Writing Web Content that Works (Interactive Technologies) (Paperback)

    Easy to read, step by step book on all things CMS! I will definitely use this book as my go to source.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  4. Hans G. Despain September 1, 2013 at 11:09 pm
    16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Interesting Political Book, June 11, 2013
    By 
    Hans G. Despain (Longmeadow, MA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America (Hardcover)

    Capitalism and democracy have a turbulent and unhappy relationship. Capitalism, either with intervention and regulation (the liberal approach) or without intervention and regulation (the conservative approach) generates inequality; and since 1970 the inequality is massive, both within the American economic system and between nations.

    Democracy is predicated upon political equality.

    Decades of economic inequality has empowered corporations. Mega-corporations now control the American economy and the political (election) process. The mainstream debates of austerity, regulation, intervention, and stimulus are all but irrelevant to the real problems facing the nation. John Nichols and Robert McChesney argue, in this well-written and powerful book, the United States is better understood as a “Dollarocracy” – or the rule of money rather than the rule of the people. A uniquely U.S. form of plutocracy where those with the most dollars advertise and lobbying so too get the most votes.

    Nichols and McChesney argue Dollarocracy is tacitly accepted as more or less `business-as-usual’ in American politics. Tens of billions of dollars are spent by corporation and the wealthy on lobbying, public relations, and elections. These efforts generate large returns for corporations and wealthy, and corrupt both the American political system and economy.

    The most egregious systemic corruption is American financial institutions. In less than two decades the six largest financial institutions have grown their assets from 17 percent of U.S. GDP to breathtaking 64 percent. Nichols and McChesney demonstrate the corporate media is not hurt by these trends but benefit handsomely during elections, with political advertising accounting for 25 – 30 percent of revenues. News outlets tend to “fan the flames” of the idiocy of elections campaigns rather than tame its corruption. Worse, resources toward journalism have gone in sharp decline, and an over focus on political gossip and personality dominants coverage.

    Cutting the size of government, slashing public spending, and instituting austerity principles is now the default position of the majority of mainstream politicians. Nichols and McChesney argue that austerity is wrongheaded and find strong support from these three recent books:Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea, The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills, and Debtors’ Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility.

    Nonetheless, the lobbying, public relations efforts, and campaign contributions have increased the ability for large firms to increase interest and profit based incomes. The wealthiest are becoming ever more wealthy and ever more politically powerful. The Internet has not tamed Dollarocracy, but has inflamed it.

    Nichols and McChesney argue this is an abandonment of the principles of democracy.

    Nonetheless Nichols and McChesney are optimistic something can be done. First the political power of corporations and wealthy must be circumvented. They maintain:

    * Guarantee the right of every citizen eighteen and older to vote.

    * Empower Congress to set national minimum electoral standards for all to follow.

    * Provide protection against attempts to disenfranchise individual voters.

    * Eliminate those rules and practices that give some voters more power than other
    voters.

    * Ensure that every vote cast is counted correctly.

    To make these voting rights meaningful, Nichols and McChensey argue “it is absolutely necessary to assure that the people’s representatives can establish rules for how campaigns are financed and to establish once and for all” that “`the words people, person, or citizen as used in the Constitution do not include corporations.'”

    This is an important political book. It is a bit disappointing that Nichols and McChensey fail to fully address the political economy and specifically the Oligopolistic Capitalism that generates the economic inequality and motivates the political corruptions. Unless the Oligopolistic economic power of corporations is addressed I am far less hopeful than Nichols and McChensey that “voting rights” will have much of an impact on the Oligarchic political power they aim to transform.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  5. Joseph G. Peschek September 1, 2013 at 11:43 pm
    9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    One Dollar, One Vote? It’s Happening Here, June 27, 2013
    By 
    Joseph G. Peschek (Saint Paul, Minnesota) –

    This review is from: Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America (Hardcover)

    A core principle of democracy is political equality. However political theorists have long acknowledged that social and economic inequality erodes the meaning and vibrancy of democratic equality. In “Dollorocracy” John Nichols and Robert McChesney provide perhaps the most detailed account yet of how the value of “one person, one vote” has been subordinated to something like the practice of “one dollar, one vote” in contemporary American political life. Their detailed examination of the “money and media election complex” should guide readers to ask whether or not “capitalist democracy” is an oxymoron. Yet they also outline the basis for a reform movement, centered on a Constitutional “right to vote,” that if enacted could turn around the ongoing de-democratization of America. Essential reading.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  6. Robert David STEELE Vivas September 1, 2013 at 11:48 pm
    7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Sickening at Two Levels — Superb Indictment of Periphery, Completely Avoids Two Party Tyranny Issue, July 19, 2013
    By 
    Robert David STEELE Vivas (Oakton, VA United States) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Dollarocracy: How the Money and Media Election Complex is Destroying America (Hardcover)

    This book makes me sick at two levels.

    Level 1: It is the best treatment available of what I and many others have been saying for years. My own treatment was provided in a Preface, “Paradigms of Failure,” in the book under my signature below, that also had a preface by Thom Hartmann, another by Tom Atlee, and a third, reprinted, from Senator Bernie Sanders. The entire book is free online, so I am not pimping it.

    Level 2: The book is at best naive and at worst deliberately misleading in suggesting that Congress somehow needs to be “empowered” to resist. This is absolute and utter bull. I ran for President in 2012, accepted by the Reform Party, listed at Politics1, interviewed for On The Issues, and I ran for two reasons: to get all of the best ideas in one place (We the People Reform Coalition) and to test the boundaries of the two-party tyranny as immotalized in Theresa Amato’s outrageously superb Grand Illusion: The Myth of Voter Choice in a Two-Party Tyranny. I specifically ran to be able to contact every single other Presidential candidate from the small parties, and to learn — as I did — that not a single one of them could overcome their ego (as Occupy could not overcome its mob) to come together in a demand for Electoral Reform from 2011 in time for 2012. That report to Hackers on Planet Earth and also published in Reality Sandwish is easily found online by searching for “How I Tested the Boundaries of the Two-Party Tyranny.”

    Here is what this book does NOT tell you, and the reason it gets only four stars from me (it is superb in what it does tell you, but misses the key point): NINE TIMES the US Congress has been asked to pass legislation that would mandate — for federal elections only — that the six small parties blocked from ballot access (Constitution, Green, Libertarian, Natural Law, Reform, and Socialist) — and Independent candidates — be guaranteed both ballot access and debate access. NINE TIMES, the last four sponsored by Ron Paul, the two-party tyranny has refused. They have a deal: they borrow one trillion a year in our name, one third of a federal budget that is documented to be 50% waste, and in return they share the right to loot the public treasury and pay off their voting blocks — corporate welfare and the banks for the Republicans, individual welfare for the Democrats. Obama is an anomaly — Wall Street bought the white half, the Progressive got the black half, and we all know how this turned out.

    I have published multiple book review lists, all leading back to their Amazon page, at Phi Beta Iota the Public Intelligence Blog under Books, but two I want to highlight here because these are the best books available on Amazon that I have reviewed, on these two topics:

    Worth a Look: Book Reviews on Corruption 2.0

    Worth a Look: Book Reviews on Democracy Lost & Found

    I embrace all that the book offers, but it’s a bit like Top Gun, where this is some of the best writing around, right up to the point where it gets killed by not touching on the key point: there is nothing wrong with America that cannot be fixed by Electoral Reform and/or Congress living up to its Article 1 responsibilities. Our Congress is corrupt to the bone. Organized money can always be defeated by organized people, but if the elected representatives sell out, then the organized people have to re-organize.

    Ron Paul and Dennis Kucinich could have won a third party candidacy in 2012 if they had been willing to break with their chosen tyranny pal and if the small party candidates had been willing to join a coalition cabinet and Occupy has been willing to organize for electoral reform. No, no, and no. Three strikes, you have the government and the economy you deserve — money paid beats attention not paid.

    See Also:
    Gaming the Vote: Why Elections Aren’t Fair (and What We Can Do About It)
    Deer Hunting with Jesus: Dispatches from America’s Class War
    Betrayal: How Black Intellectuals Have Abandoned the Ideals of the Civil Rights Era
    Downsizing Democracy: How America Sidelined Its Citizens and Privatized Its Public

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Comments are closed.