The Gig Bag Book of Alternate Tunings for All Guitarists Reviews

//The Gig Bag Book of Alternate Tunings for All Guitarists Reviews

The Gig Bag Book of Alternate Tunings for All Guitarists Reviews

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By | 2013-06-17T08:25:43+00:00 June 17th, 2013|Gigs Media|3 Comments

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3 Comments

  1. Blake Leavitt "Entrepreneur" June 17, 2013 at 9:15 am
    32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Why pay $100k for a “degree” when you can Self Educate?, November 8, 2011
    By 
    Blake Leavitt “Entrepreneur” (Denver, CO USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I found this book to be highly entertaining and enlightening. A lot of the books I’ve been reading lately have been great but mainly re-affirming what I already know. Michael gave me quite a few great new ideas and numerous entertaining stories to back his arguments and make his points. I felt as though he readily admits that for some, higher education may be a totally feasible option, but the main question would be “to what cost?” His ending Epilogue about the coming “Education Bubble” sums it all up incredibly well. Most people (including most of my colleagues) graduate University with HUGE amounts of debt only to be able to find jobs serving you & me at Starbucks or similar high-school type jobs. There is no way that they’ll be able to pay off there school loans at their income levels and even if they file for Bankruptcy they still owe on their student loans. Having been well over $50k in debt and working behind a shovel for minimum wage with a college degree, I know the overwhelming stress that creates. It’s enough to make you want to off yourself! So the question is, why pay all that money & go through it all in the first place when there are other options like khanacademy.org (which has a HUGE selection of completely free educational videos, including everything from Trig, to Economics, to Art History!) or other resources he lists in his book.

    I am a person who has purchased online training seminars/ courses for business & investing, reads a non-fiction business/ self-help book about every other month and has even shelled out over $7k/seminar for similar weekend seminars. I also hold a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in entrepreneurism & finance. I can honestly say that all of my success has come from me busting my ass & figuring out what people want & delivering on that (just like what Michael suggests in his book). Never really liking school and going to college to fulfill my father’s desire to have a male member of our family graduate from higher education I can honestly say that what I have learned in my self education FAR exceeds my formal business classes and at a fraction of the total cost. But I knew that it would. My father is a very successful small business owner who dropped out of college and is far more successful in business & life than most of my colleagues parents who hold degrees. He always told me that continuos self education and refinement in all areas of your life was the key to being successful and happy.

    My only major critique of the book (and of most business non-fiction books) is that it can be a little long winded at times. I found myself a few times thinking, “Skip to the end Michael, you’ve already made your point.” But I would also say that for a few lessons, I needed that length for it to really sink in.

    My apologies for such a long winded and personal review, but I think what Michael touches in on is a very sensitive subject that many of us hold very personal. People are going to either love it or hate it. Remember that when reading reviews & if you’re skeptical, pick it up at your local library, but just remember… that’s exactly the type of self educate Michael urges his readers to do.

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  2. Reviewer June 17, 2013 at 9:47 am
    388 of 466 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Felt I had to Wash My Hands when I was done, October 7, 2011
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    First: i would rate 2 1/2 stars if possible but not three!
    The premise of this book was really promising. I thought it was going to be, based on the preface, about people who have educated themselves and become experts or broke new ground in technology, finance, and other fields.

    What I got: multilevel marketing scams and sleaze. It starts about the third chapter, where he mentions his ‘friend’ Eben Pagan.. I looked up the guys name and his site.. something in my gut just told me something was very very wrong.. well I looked up his name and it turns out he was one of those ‘dating’ ‘seduction’ hustlers. It just got sleazier from there, Ellsberg goes on to say how you should ‘lift people ‘ like Pagan up – and then people will lift you up… does this sound like a non-financial ponzi scheme or what? Ellesberg never mentions Pagan’s past, he just says the “runs a 30 million internet marketing company” – gee just like the founder of Zappo’s eh? Ellesberg is not upfront about this, implying he knows its a liability and undermines his point. He often refers to copy writers who launched products that made ## million in sales but, suspiciously, never mentions what those products or companies were.( In fairness, he does point out who his personal friends are.)

    Then I started to notice all the plugs for his buddies in the pages and I felt like I had paid for an advertisement. I ‘thought’ having a column on Forbes that this guy would be somewhat respectable, but I should have known better having first heard of him from a link to Tim Ferris (The four hour hustle)’s web site. The cross-marketing is annoying an undermines credibility.. Anyone who has read such books knows the pattern by now: “Four Steps to doing a successful career” Step one “increase networking” You really can’t become a great networker without reading “this book by author blah blah blah (plug for book here, and the author of the book having reciprocal agreement to plug you)” But it’s not just books, he constantly pushes expensive seminars as well (not his own). Sorry the idea that you have to spend 4000.00 on some ’empowerment’ weekend is hogwash. i sincerely doubt these meetings are little more than some insiders making money and a lot suckers out 4000.00.

    These guys sell dreams, not real advice. They sell the idea you can work four hours, or you can live like a rock star. A lot of times there advice is counter productive or at the very least unfounded.. they are good confidence men, but what they advise has no efficacy. To be fair to Ellsberg, he does clearly say that your chances of becoming a rock star or billionaire are largely out of your control and he does often site the more temperate Seth Godin.

    I also found the writing sophomoric – call me a prude, but if someone has to constantly curse rather than think about what he is cursing about, he’s no better than authors who write in cliches (for a wonderful analysis of this read George Orwell’s “Politics and the English Language”)

    I believe that education, particularly higher education, has become a bit of a financial scam, and educational standards have shrunk. But statements like “What do you want your kid to learn, trigonometry, we have computers for that” quoted from one of his “experts” with tacit approval is beyond ignorant.

    On the up side, there is some practical advice here and there, some good stories and even if you don’t want to emulate ellesberg’s tactics, analysis of his self marketing and promotion might be helpful.

    Also he does offer practical warnings about the impracticality of today’s higher education, the sense of entitlement it creates that cuts one off from opportunities (the idea of being ‘above’ certain types of work, or that abstract theories of ‘film studies’ will get you a job anywhere, let alone in film ). Some of his descriptions of the mentality of formal education are amusing and eye opening.

    lastly, people who game amazon (like Ferris) are notorious for deleting negative reviews (notice all the short five star reviews, usually the ‘user’s only one? , so I will saving this off line and will check for occasional attempts by the author or his minions to delete it).

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  3. Jenny Blake June 17, 2013 at 9:59 am
    37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Game-changer — do not pass go until you read this book!, September 29, 2011
    By 
    Jenny Blake (Bay Area, CA United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Ellsberg’s book is a referendum against the notion that higher education is mandatory for self-made success (in fields other than law and medicine that require highly trained professionals). The book comes at a critical time as more and more graduates find themselves buried in debt but without a job to show for it.

    Through dozens of in-depth interviews with movers and shakers, Ellsberg uncovers what he sees as the seven key self-education categories for career success — that they DON’T teach you in college.

    The millionaires he interviews are self-taught and self-made — and their stories are inspiring for anyone who is looking to rely less on others (school, teachers, managers, companies) for career success and more on themselves and their highest creative faculties.

    The seven key success skills Ellsberg highlights are:
    1. How to make your work meaningful and your meaning work
    2. How to find great mentors and teachers, connect with powerful and influential people, and build a world-class network
    3. What every successful person needs to know about marketing, and how to teach yourself
    4. What every successful person needs to know about sales, and how to teach yourself
    5. How to invest for success (the art of bootstrapping)
    6. Build the brand of you (or, to hell with resumes!)
    7. The entrepreneurial mindset versus the employee mindset — become the author of your own life

    This book is a page-turner and a must-read — I read it on one cross-country plane flight, then immediately gave it to my brother (a more recent graduate) and said “do not pass go until you finish this book.”

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